'The more you expose bacteria to antibiotics, the more it develops a resistance'

'The more you expose bacteria to antibiotics, the more it develops a resistance'

Originally published on 702

Imagine going to a hospital for a minor procedure. You think you will be out within a few hours and then you find out you have picked up a superbug due to antibiotic resistance.

Antibiotic resistance accounts for the death of 700 000 people around the world each year.

This figure is expected to rise to at least 10 million people each year by the year 2050 and that is because many of us misuse antibiotics.

Speaking to Bongani Bingwa, Antimicrobial Portfolio Manager at Pharma Dynamics Annemarie Blackmore says the first antibiotic that was discovered was penicillin in the early part of the 20th century.

Antibiotics can kill any infection that is caused by bacteria, so before the discovery of penicillin, people were actually dying from infections that could now be considered as non- events such as bronchitis, pneumonia and an infection if you had a deep wound.

— Annemarie Blackmore, Antimicrobial Portfolio Manager at Pharma Dynamics

But what happens with an antibiotic bacteria is, the more that you expose the bacteria to an antibiotic, it does develop a resistance over time.

— Annemarie Blackmore, Antimicrobial Portfolio Manager at Pharma Dynamics

She adds that if we misuse antibiotics and overexpose them, we speed up the process of resistance.

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