Harmful antibiotics in our gut

Harmful antibiotics in our gut

Originally published on The Siver Week

Today scientists know that in our gut is inhabited with trillions of bacteria that play an important role in digestion and immunity. But until recently, not been large studies on the response of the intestinal microflora to antibiotics.

In new scientific work, an international group of Danish and Chinese scientists have studied the condition of the intestinal microflora during taking antibiotics.

For their study, the researchers invited 12 volunteers who for some time took antibiotics. Subjects underwent a full medical examination before and after taking antibiotics.

After a course of antibiotics the composition of the intestinal microflora returning to normal only after about six months after this treatment — and not completely. Some types of bacteria disappear from its structure, while others are not always useful for the body — fixed here, — commented the scientists.

It should be noted that the study was conducted on healthy men, so the result may differ from the consequences that could happen with a not quite healthy patients.

In the experiment, the volunteers received a cocktail of popular medicine drugs that are usually prescribed to treat various bacterial infections. After four days of treatment, the scientists observed behavior of intestinal bacteria.

At the end of the experiment, the scientists collected samples of feces to determine the composition of the intestinal microflora. Tests taken immediately after completion of the antibiotics in a few days and 6 months.

In the first case it was noted “the destruction and partial survival”: the number of bacteria fell sharply, but some managed to survive.

Six months later, the number of intestinal bacteria almost reached the norm, but their composition remained scarce.

Among the microbes disappeared nine of the previous species, but showed a new — obviously, survived the treatment with antibiotics in the form of inactive spores and sustainable benefited from the emergence of niches for life. All this testifies again to how careful it is necessary to apply treatment with antibiotics, said the researchers.

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