Tiny viruses could be our answer to antibiotic resistance

Tiny viruses could be our answer to antibiotic resistance

Originally published on Siliconrepublic

The global problem of antibiotic resistance, whereby all available antibiotic drugs become useless, is becoming more and more apparent as time goes on.

With only two new antibiotics developed in the past 70 years and being no closer to finding a new one, researchers are looking for alternatives.

One such researcher is University College Cork PhD student Julie Callanan who presented her work at Researchfest as part of Inspirefest 2018.

Rather than trying to develop a new drug, Callanan is working with a type of tiny virus called bacteriophage. Despite its healing properties being known about for a century, western medicine had been left in the dark.

Now, though, bacteriophage could be about to make a big difference worldwide.

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Researchers calculate the economic cost of antimicrobial resistance per antibiotic consumed

Researchers calculate the economic cost of antimicrobial resistance per antibiotic consumed

Antibiotic development—we gave it a push, now it needs a pull

Antibiotic development—we gave it a push, now it needs a pull