SILENT KILLER Student, 21, dies of sepsis just four days after being sent home from work with ‘chest infection’

SILENT KILLER Student, 21, dies of sepsis just four days after being sent home from work with ‘chest infection’

Originally published on The Sun

A young woman has died from sepsis just four days after being sent home from work with flu-like symptoms.

Millie Wyles, 21, was rushed to St Thomas’s Hospital, London in the early hours of August 17.

Staff tried to treat her organ failure but after four days, nothing more could be done.

The University of Essex student, who graduated with a first in economics, was rushed to Medway Maritime Hospital after being sent home from her work at the Harps Inn in Minster, Kent.

MUM'S AGONY

Millie’s mum, Annie Wyles, of Sheerness, Kent said: “She went to work and came home during the week and then she decided she wanted to go to A&E.

“They didn’t know if it was some sort of chest infection but needed to oxygenate her blood to boost the white blood cells.

“It was scary and devastating.

“Everything was going so quick and it was out of our control."

The family had just returned from a holiday to Tenerife to mark a year since the passing of Mrs Wyles' mother.

Millie’s sister Emmy Piesley said: “She was kind and gave everything to all of us. She was probably the more mature one.

“She wasn’t judgemental, she even helped homeless people and would buy them food.”

An outpouring of support is being shared on social media with friends posting memories and tributes and donating to a crowdfunding page.

Ms Wyles said: “The generosity is overwhelming and has brought us an awful lot of comfort.”

The money will go to support the intensive care unit which treated her at St Thomas's.

What is sepsis?

SEPSIS, also referred to as blood poisoning or septicaemia, is a reaction to an infection that causes the body to damage its own organs and tissues.

The body’s immune system goes into overdrive.

If not spotted and treated quickly, it can lead to shock, multiple organ failure and death.

It can strike after chest or water infections, problems in the abdomen such as burst ulcers or simple skin injuries including cuts or bites.

Survivors might suffer serious health problems after the illness, including swollen limbs, lethargy, hair loss, insomnia, flashbacks, depression and repeated infections.

The condition kills more people in the UK each year than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined.

With 150,000 cases diagnosed in Britain annually, sepsis costs the NHS £2.93billion each year and almost 35 per cent of patients will die.

Each year around the world there are 18million cases of sepsis, resulting in eight million deaths.

The UK Sepsis Trust estimates earlier identification and treatment could save 14,000 lives a year.

Symptoms to look out for in adults

IT is vital sepsis is spotted as quickly as possible. Here are the symptoms to look out for:

It is vital sepsis is spotted as quickly as possible. Here are the symptoms to look out for:

  • Slurred speech which is triggered by a lack of blood supply to brain.

  • Mottled or discoloured skin can appear anywhere on the body.

  • Extreme shivering or muscle pain due to a lack of oxygen.

  • Passing no urine over the course of 24 hours as kidneys fail.

  • Severe breathlessness when body senses there is not enough oxygen getting to the brain. The illness increases the “drive” to breathe to increase it. May also lead to fast breathing or a fast heartbeat.

  • A high temperature.

  • Chronic tiredness.

  • Change in mental state such as confusion or disorientation.

  • Swelling of affected area.

Millie had graduated with a first and was working at The Harps Inn before deciding whether she wanted to work at the Stock Exchange.

A spokeswoman for the Harps Inn said: “Millie was an absolute pleasure to have working for us.

“She lit up the pub every time she was at work with her beautiful smile and infectious laugh.

“Millie had her whole life ahead of her having just graduated at university and we are sure she would have gone on to great things in life.

“She was hard-working, honest and a reliable member our Harps family and she will be sorely missed by all of our staff and customers.

“Our thoughts are with Millie’s family at this devastating time.”

Millie leaves mum Annie, father Keith, sisters Emmy and Maddie, and nephew Rupert.

Antibiotic resistance could kill us before climate change, warns country's top medical officer

Antibiotic resistance could kill us before climate change, warns country's top medical officer

Starship deploys app to combat antibiotic resistance challenges

Starship deploys app to combat antibiotic resistance challenges